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20130124
20130201
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CSPAN 5
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
cuomo from erik. james says in connecticut there are two major problems, the deficit and more taxes. both problems are created by one party rule. what are the big issues in your state? join that conversation on facebook by looking for c-span. let us take a look at the balance of power in state. we can see here who controls the governors' seats. 30 republicans states in red, 19 democratic, and one independent in rhode island. but as your what ray has to say on our democrats line. caller: good morning. i wanted to say that i believe here in the state of texas -- our standard of living is what keeps is going. nobody can live on $7.25 hour. our standard of living is so below the economy it should be at $12 per hour. everything is so expensive right now. it should be, at the very least, $12 per hour. host: you are calling to raise the minimum wage? caller: yes, ma'am. if everybody makes at least $12 an hour, this country would boom so fast. here in the state of texas -- i think it is everywhere. the corruption of the governor and the mayor. big corporate donors, big business owners. they
, a trillion dollar tax hike took effect. the senate voted to prevent tax hikes and 90% of americans. and made the lower tax hikes permanent. president obama got less revenue than the speaker offered in the first place. in short, there is no way we were going to get a better deal for the american tax payer. we wanted to keep tax hikes low for everybody. we wanted to cut spending. otherwise every single taxpayer would have paid higher taxes and our economy would have gotten into a nosedive. the decision was simple. if you think a bill needs to pass, you vote for it. many of my colleagues voted the other way. i respect their decision. prudence demands mutual understanding, especially among friends. my colleagues and i saw the same thing. we wanted a smaller, smarter government. we simply differed on the means. that is the difficulty of governing. it should not be a cause for division. our tactics will differ from issue to issue, but our strategy remains the same. in the next four years, opportunity will not come easily. we have to pay our bills and make sure we can pay our bills tomorrow. to do
finance minister started an initiative on this that this year g8 will look at tax evasion and tax fraud. i think it's enormously important issue, and i think the regulation on the shadow banking system, um, also needs to play a very important role for the russia meeting for the g20. we have quite a lot of regulation for our banks, basel iii comes to mind here. here, actually, we have to be vigilant that the lending capacity that is to boost, after all, economic growth doesn't get too contained, too limited, and i can only hope and join our partners in the united states to introdiscuss deuce this -- introduce this as well, otherwise a new imbalance here. through better regulation of banks, the capital that they need to the capital reserves that they need to have, we also see moral hazard in the sense that people increasingly seem to fly into the shadows of shadow banking. we were at one in saying when we agreed this at the g20 and the thought that every financial instrument, um, every financial be product, every financial market needs to be placed in regulation. we are very far from that. i
-class families, of which could then go to educating their kids or building up their savings. tax reform, that is also important for conservatives and republicans. host: a question from our viewer -- guest: tom cotten, the congressman from arkansas, a friend of mine. he went to harvard, which i went to, so i'm biased. he went to harvard law school, which i don't hold against him. he volunteered for the army in 2004, served as an officer in iraq and afghanistan, work for is that business a while, had a close primary against an aggressive womaperson. but he won. there he is, a first term congressman in the house. he will be able to weigh in on the chuck hagel nomination. he has spoken eloquently on that. he is a real rising star in the house. he is already respected by his peers. he was involved with the speaker, paul ryan, and others, in trying to devise a tactical maneuver to get the debt ceiling moved back and to able to deal with sequester. he will have a tough decision in a few months. there's pressure on him in arkansas to run for senate in 2014 against price yoryor, a vulnerable dem
on rye kind of what we're seeing. here is one thing that we're watching. the payroll tax increase didn't bother us when the price of gasoline was down. but over the past few weeks, we've seen the price of gas go up by anywhere from 30 to -- 25 to 35 cents per gallon. that really puts an impact on $20 a week for 50,000 in income. that price in gasoline really was going to make double hit behind the increase in payroll taxes. >> that is an interesting point. i hadn't really thought about that. when it comes to the jobs number on friday, kevin, tell me what you think the market is looking for? what would be really good news and what would be look out? >> they want it big. the guys are going to probably pull bids out and put up some shorts going into it. i'd watch for an air pocket down. my own opinion is i think you'll see a number finally over 250. we're overdue for that number. and -- >> the dawn of february 1st? >> they don't have time to cook the books by february 1st on that, do they? huh? >> it's friday. >> they're supposed to be good at it, i don't know. >> well, they are -- >> i t
paycheck from higher social security taxes. ouch. next, $27 billion, that's how much taxpayers are going to lose on the government bailout from 2008. that is up from an estimate just a couple months ago. and finally, 44 years. that's how long deborah ford has worked for the postal service and she never took a sick day. the 64-year-old retires tomorrow. way to go. brian? >> brian: there is new signs of life in the housing market in the united states of america. the latest data shows home prices are actually inching up. so is now the right time to sell or down size to get out of debility? joining us now from nashville is dave ramsey. dave, are you optimistic things are turning around or is this just a regional turn around? >> well, all real estate is like politics, it's always regional it's always local. so we've had some markets that weren't hit nearly as hard by the recession and they've come back. some of them almost roaring back. we've got other areas of the country, and particular cities that are really still struggling. you just got to look around you in your particular area across t
tax dollars, billions of them. and now all of a sudden some are suggesting we should change the rules when we are hit by the first major disaster to hit the new york city region in a very long time. that's not fair. that's not right. and we have argued against it, and i hope my colleagues will defeat the lee amendment. and i also say to my colleagues that this is not just dollars and cents. these are people who care, are waiting, homeowners waiting to rebuild their homes. they haven't moved back in. small business owners who are hanging on by a thread after building a business for 25 years. we know when the hand of god strikes, it's overwhelming for them. take rita from emerald magic lawn care. her company helps local families, schools and businesses with lawn care in the spring and summer and around the holidays they help with decorations and lights. but emerald magic's business was interrupted for many weeks. the client base dried up. rita's business will be in huge trouble. it may not survive if she doesn't get a lifeline and get one now. so this is very important. week after week,
and authorities are preparing for the worst. >>> we are bringing you a firsthand look at your tax dollars at work in the tunnel. we got a look inside the 4th bore yesterday. we found crews hard at work inside. federal stimulus funds are paying for two thirds of the 400 million-dollar project. taxpayers are funding the rest. >> when it's done caltrans will be dedicating two bores permanently to eastbound traffic and two permanently to westbound traffic. >> caltrans said the 4th is 75 to 80% done. they will start laying the road bed next month and it's set to open later this year. >>> federal safety regulators say no matter what anyone else is saying the dream liner investigation continues. the head of the ntsb unsettling description of how serious this matter may be. >>> facebook founder is getting involved in politics. . >>> welcome back. taking you live to new york. dow back from its earlier gain. still up 17.5 points, s&p500 testing the 1500 level and a lot of familiar names in stocks to watch today. johnson and johnson up, part of the dow -- and it's earning estimates. p and g better than ex
are down, the fiscal cliff agreement has locked in low taxes for most of the upper-middle class and wealthy, and there's no sign of inflation as far as the eye can see. but corporate profits can't stay high when american consumers whose spending is 70% of the u.s. economy are this pessimistic about the future. they're just not going to spend. american companies won't be able to make up the difference in forward markets. europe is careening into a recession. japan is still in deep trouble. china's growth has slowed. profits are the highest share of the u.s. economy on record. wages are the lowest. but this imbalance can't and won't last. >> can't and won't. and look what's happening on wall street. they're doing better, willie, than ever before. >> mm-hmm. >> ever before. for the past four years, wall street has exploded over the past four years. real income has dropped for middle-class americans. the poverty rate's gone up. one in four americans are on food stamps. you talk about two americas. john edwards is right. >> incomes. >> over the past four years, and it's certainly not the preside
differently. he supported tax increases. what does that say to you? >> two things. he joins a growing list of senators whoa are frustrated with the senate. that's a problem for all americans. not one party or another, but it has to be functional again. two, split cally speaking, it's not a safe republican state. this is what people have to keep their eye on. republicans lean as the favorites in the beginning. nothing is a sure thing even in the state of georgia. >> what do you think? you study georgia closely. >> absolutely. one of the first states i campaign in. he said it has been a really outstanding conservative member before i got to know him. as well as the united states senate. he is on the farm bills and authored most of the authorization bills. clearly his decision is personal i'm sure. he is frustrated with washington, d.c. and members of both parties are frustrated with the gridlock. the republicans will nominate somebody in main street, but while georgia is the so-called red state, president obama was able to get more than 45% of the vote there. i assume that we are going have
that in our tax code. our tax code is so complicated because there are so many giveaways to the special interest groups or the well-connected that don't privilege americans that work hard and try to put food on the table. >> i have often wondered and explored this if people have an appetite for limited government? americans in general, the government keeps getting bigger. we struggle to obtain the a slower right of growth, which is a great vibtry in a way it is. have you found an appetite for limited government? or limited government for others and not for themselves? >> i believe so. i said often times in the campaign trail that the constitution is very popular and big government is not popular. that is where we should anchor our program and policies. you saw this in the president's speech on monday even though it was a very liberal speech. he didn't call for big government. >> the inaugural address? >> yeah, the inaugural address. that's because he knows what bill clinton knew in 1996, that big government is over. so i do think -- >> the era is over. >> yeah. again, if political leade
this in two buckets. one bucket is reducing costs. the other bucket is increasing taxes. if you think you can get this all done, to the amount we have to do with, let's say, a ten-year program, you're going to have to dig very deep. we need a third bucket and it is sitting right there and we should use it. it is energy. fracking, for example, has created 1.75 million jobs. billions and billions of dollars going to the states and federal coffers. we have more energy than anybody in the world and if we, in an environmentally friendly way, acquire it, go on the federal lands, do it in the right way, we'll get that extra piece of cash, and bring manufacturing and jobs back to the united states or create them in the united states because of our energy. >> the last four years of the obama presidency was marred by not great relationships between the business community and the administration. you are one of the key faces of the business community. have you reached out to the president or has he reached out to you since his election to say let's make this four years look very different? >> just rememb
limits. your governors, senators, mayors, city council, dog catcher, tax collector. are you in favor of term limits, yes or no? here are the numbers. host: you can also reach out to us by social media. host: i want to show you some of the numbers from the recently released gallup poll. they ask americans support for establishing term limits for federal lawmakers. suppose on election day you could vote for key issues as well as candidates. or againstote for the number of terms congress and senate can serve? nationally among adults those voting for term limits are in the 75% range. those who say they would vote against term limits, 21%. those who had no opinion, 5%. breaking it down among political parties, republicans, those voting for, who say they would vote for term limits, 82% of republicans questioned in this gallup poll, 82% say they would vote for term limits. 15% say they would vote against. 3% say they have no opinion. independence, 79% say they would vote for term limits. 17% say they would vote against. 4% say they have no opinion. and among democrats, 65% say that they wou
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)